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Get answers to your gardening questions at the Gardeners' Community which includes a Vegetables forum, Herbs forum and Growing Vegetables & Herbs blog.  Search, ask or answer. Use the Gardening Events calendar, view/post photos and blog too.

Books

Growing Vegetable Gardens - Store

Trellis

Gardener's Supply Company
Gardeners.com

Plants & Seeds

Growing Vegetable Gardens - Store
GrowingVegetableGardens.com
W. Atlee Burpee Company
Burpee.com
Cook's Garden
CooksGarden.com
Gardener's Supply Company
Gardeners.com



Planning


Online Garden Planning Tool

Zucchini

Zucchini is in the group of summer squashes including crookneck squash, pattypan and Italian marrow.

We do not understand gardeners who complain about the over-productivity of zucchini. It's a blessing!

Zucchini is best when picked young - After questioning these overwhelmed gardeners, we discovered the real culprit: those oversized "submarines" over 18 inches in length. We agree there isn't much one can do with those and they're even hard to give away. So don't let the fruit get to that point. Pick early and enjoy the young tender fruits. At the store, you'd pay a premium price for "baby" vegetables.

The fruit is so versatile - Thinly sliced young fruits are a nice surprise in salads. Fruits also work well in stir fries and are included in our grilled vegetable medley (along with peppers and onions). They are also an essential component of caponata and ratatouille. And, let's not forget zucchini bread!

The blossoms are edible - Raw as a garnish or topping a salad, they make any dish gourmet. Cooked blossoms can be battered and fried in a little oil for a wonderful taste sensation. You've probably seen your favorite TV chef prepare show-stopping stuffed squash blossoms. Now, you can impress your friends and family too.

Harvest only the male blossoms (unless the goal is to reduce production) and leave a few male blossoms on the vine for pollination purposes. There are always many more male flowers than female. Distinguish the males from the females by the thickness of their stems. Males are thin while the females' are very thick. You'll find the developing squash as a bulge at the base of the female flower. For a special treat, harvest the female blossom along with the tiny squash growing at the end.

You don't need many plants - One or two per person is plenty.

Characteristics

Starting Seed

Planting and Tending

Companions

More Information

Visit the Vegtables Forum at GreatLakesGardeners.com to get answers to your growing vegetables questions. To ask a new question, Register if you haven't already done so(it's free and helps protect the forum from spam), click on Start New Topic, enter your question and click on Post New Topic.

Come join us at our Vegetables forum, Herbs forum and Growing Vegetables & Herbs blog.

You may also appreciate these books on growing vegetable gardens.